We recently completed a historic porch restoration at the Harris-Cameron mansion in Harrisburg, PA.  Part of the project involved fabricating new wood columns to match a few existing column we were salvaging.  For that work we turned to Somerset Door & Column Company.

Historic Porch Restoration

For over 100 years, Somerset Door & Column Company has manufactured architectural wood columns, doors, and entryways. Built on tradition and authenticity, Somerset Door & Column uses trained artisan craftsmen and kiln-dried domestic and imported hardwoods to create long-lasting, high-quality custom doors and columns. While some manufacturers outsource parts of their production process, Somerset maintains complete control over the quality of their production process by fabricating everything on-site at their facilities.

We had previously worked with Somerset Door & Column on another historic porch restoration we did in Staten Island and knew their quality of work was commendable.  Chuck is picky about the vendors and contractors we work with and he gives Somerset a solid two thumbs up.

“There isn’t anything they can’t do”, he says.

 

 

Articles on Preservation of Historic Buildings and Architectures

 

Greenfield Bridge Replacement and Restoration

In response to plans to demolish and replace the historic but structurally deficient 1922 Beechwood Boulevard (Greenfield) Bridge over the Parkway East (I-376), the Young Preservationists Association (YPA) advocated saving and restoring the bridge’s original ornamental approaches by naming them to the 2012 Top Ten Preservation Opportunities List……Continue reading

Pittsburgh’s African American History

After nearly three years of work, YPA is pleased to present the first-ever tourguide of African American historic sites in the southwestern Pennsylvania region. Called “Discover the Legacy: The African American Experience in Southwestern Pennsylvania……Continue reading

Pablo Picasso’s former home/studio is for sale!

For a whopping $220 million you can buy the former home of acclaimed cubist artist Pablo Picasso. This beautiful villa and studio in the French town of Mougins just north of Cannes was home to Picasso for the last 12 years of his life.Apart from his avant guard body of work, Picasso is known for his many mistresses and the immense amount of personal wealth he amassed from the sales of his work……Continue reading

Autumn houses

Here at House Crazy, autumn is a favorite season. Halloween, Thanksgiving, corn mazes, and of course, going overboard with pumpkin decorations. The light is elongated and the hues become earthy and intense. Fall just feels spooky and special – at least when you live in an old house like I do. So I thought I would do a mini-fall equinox celebration by featuring some photos of houses and cabins in all their autumn glory……Continue reading

New Zealand’s Larnach Castle

New Zealand is a country blessed with tremendous natural beauty, laid back peaceful people, and my personal favorite: no snakes. But for all its riches and blessings, New Zealand has only one castle – Larnach Castle just outside of Dunedin on the south island……Continue reading

Preservation Pennsylvania has released their “Pennsylvania At-Risk: Twenty-Year Retrospective of Pennsylvania’s Endangered Historic Properties, Where Are They Now” edition. It’s a fascinating look at preservation in action and we’ll be posting a look at each property in a series of posts over the next several months.

INTRODUCTION
Preservation Pennsylvania established the annual Pennsylvania At Risk list in 1992, making us the first statewide preservation organization in the United States to have an annual roster of endangered historic properties. Since 1992, we have listed and worked to preserve more than 200 endangered historic resources, including individual buildings, historic districts and thematic resources statewide. For 2012, as we celebrate the 30th anniversary of our organization, we are presenting a 20-year retrospective edition of Pennsylvania At Risk. In this issue, we revisit some of the amazing historic places across the Commonwealth, some of which have been rescued from extinction through preservation and rehabilitation efforts, and others that still need our help.

Approximately 18% of Pennsylvania’s At Risk properties have been lost, having been demolished or substantially altered. Another 32% have been saved or are in a condition or situation where the identified threat no longer poses a problem for the historic property. Approximately 50% of the 201 At Risk resources remain in danger, or we have not been able to confirm their current status as either saved or lost.

By monitoring these properties over the past 20 years and working with individuals and organizations trying to preserve them, we have learned many valuable lessons. Those lessons are called out throughout this publication.

• AT RISK •

2010 — Neuweiler Brewery, Lehigh County

Lehigh County

One of the most modern breweries in the United States when it opened in 1913, Neuweiler Brewery survived prohibition and continued to operate until 1968. The property has been largely vacant for more than 40 years, its buildings neglected and deteriorated. As a result of condemnation proceedings that concluded in September 2009, the Redevelopment Authority of the City of Allentown (RACA) took ownership of the property. They commissioned a structural assessment of the property, which showed that the surviving elements of the industrial complex are structurally sound. In June 2011, the site was included in a 128-acre area designated as the Neighborhood Improvement Zone (NIZ), which allows qualified state and local tax revenues to be used for payment of debt service on bonds or loans issued for the development project. RACA conducted a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment for the property in October 2011; cleanup of the site and remediation of hazardous materials is in progress. In November of 2011, the public Allentown Commercial & Industrial Development Authority (ACIDA) acquired the property and continued RACA’s effort to prepare the property for redevelopment. In July 2012, a Site Reuse Study was completed for the property. This study included a comprehensive analysis of physical facilities, historic structures, and financial feasibility and tested five proposed reuse alternatives for the site. Several potential new uses for the historic brewery property exist, but none are economically viable without significant financial intervention. The Site Reuse Study concluded that the preferred alternative was to demolish two of the complex’s buildings and rehabilitate the remaining buildings for use as a combination of residential apartments, retail and office space, and a restaurant and brew pub. However, the demolition may mean that the property is not eligible for rehabilitation investment tax credits. Without the financial incentive provided by the tax credits, the Site Reuse Study found that it was then more feasible to preserve all of the historic buildings for a mixed-use rehabilitation.

Neuweiler Brewery features prominently in the 2012 Lehigh River Waterfront Master Plan, which provides an overall strategy to direct a phased development approach to the redevelopment of approximately 120 acres along the river, utilizing the unique character and heritage of the area. With the inclusion in the NIZ, site cleanup complete, and the guidance of the Existing Conditions, Site Reuse Study and Waterfront Master Plan, prospective developers have the tools they need to develop the property. Development proposals are currently being considered.

• AT RISK •

2011 — Hanover Theater, York County

York County

Originally known as the State Theater, the Hanover Theater began its 58-year run as a movie and live performance venue in 1928. The theater combines elements of the Spanish Colonial

Revival and Moderne styles and has an extravagant Arthur Brounet interior. The building was used as a theater until 1986, but has been used minimally for storage purposes since then.  The theater is in need of repairs and modernization of amenities. Under the impression that an organization called Casual Arts would acquire the theater and begin rehabilitating it after two years, a group of committed individuals formed a holding company called Historic Hanover Theater, LLC in 2007 and paid $500,000 to purchase and stabilize the building. Casual Arts did not follow through in 2009. Without the financial resources to rehabilitate the building themselves, Historic Hanover Theater began seeking a new owner with the intention and capacity to acquire and restore the unique venue. By June of 2011, no interested parties stepped forward, so Historic Hanover Theater was forced to offer it for sale on the open market. The resident caretaker moved out of the building, making it more susceptible to vandalism. The size and location of the Hanover Theater make it vulnerable to conversion to apartments, retail or other uses that would not allow for the retention of the theater’s character-defining features. With parking at a premium and a common community perception that the building is unattractive and perhaps unstable, many are calling for the demolition of this historic downtown theater. During the past year, there has been significant activity in Hanover that could help to preserve this resource and revitalize the downtown. A group interested in acquiring the Hanover Theater and rehabilitating it as a performance venue is organizing and working to develop the capacity to take on a project of this nature and scale. This is happening in conjunction with significant momentum in the community to hire a Main Street Manager and develop a convention center in other historic buildings downtown, among other activities. While the Hanover Theater is still at risk of damage from neglect, incompatible alterations and even demolition, it appears that the community of Hanover is taking the right steps to work toward downtown preservation and revitalization, likely including the Hanover Theater.

This article is a part of a series from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission’s excellent field guide on the architectural styles found in Pennsylvania.  In it, they’ve assigned key periods of development – from the Colonial period in the 18th Century to the Modern Movements of the 29th Century.  This article focuses on an overview of the Traditional/Vernacular style in Pennsylvania from 1638 through 1950

PA Architecture Early Republic Period 1780 – 1830 

The Early Republic Period marks the era when the English colonies declared their independence and the young nation was first established.  The predominant style in this period was the Federal or Adam style, a refined version of the previously popular Georgian style.  Federal style buildings were common in the period from 1780 to about 1830  and were distinguishable from their earlier Georgian counterparts mostly by the more delicate and elaborate classical  details on similar symmetrical facades.  The other style to develop in this period was the Early Classical Revival or Greek Revival style which drew its design inspiration more directly from the ancient buildings of Greece and Rome.  This Early Classical Revival style continued to be employed for much of the nineteenth century, especially for buildings in public use, schools, churches, banks and government offices.

Articles on Preservation of Historic Buildings and Architectures

 

Restoring a Piece of Aviation History

A small but mighty group arrived in New Castle, Delaware, to tackle a bank of metal-framed windows at the Bellanca Air Service Hangar. Even while working, Beth Obergh and her teenage children fell in love with historic New Castle and said……Continue reading

Conserving a 17th Century Cottage 

AiP volunteers had only been working in the village of Brecljevo for three days before just about everyone in Slovenia knew what we were up to! Word spread fast thanks to a segment on the popular news program, Slovenia Chronicle, that featured our intrepid volunteers from Australia, the US and Slovenia……Continue reading

Re-Plastering The Jean [Jacob] Hasbrouck House

New Paltz was founded in 1678 by French Huguenots, and one of its earliest houses, the Jean [Jacob] Hasbrouck House built in 1721, remains in nearly original condition. Its restoration was a multi-year, cooperative effort between non-profit organizations from the US and France……Continue reading

Restoration of the Weisel Bridge

The Weisel Bridge is an arched masonry bridge originally built to carry horse and buggy traffic on its way to Quakertown. The bridge, now a part of the Pennsylvania state park system, is limited to pedestrians and creates a feeling of historic authenticity for visitors. Sitting near the Weisel Hostel, it draws people to the site. Both park and hostel managers feared that the loss of the bridge would not only diminish the visitor experience but also lead to a loss of revenue needed to maintain the park……Continue reading

Restoration of the Francis Mill

In 2003, AiP received a plea to help save the historic Francis Mill, which was on the verge of collapse. We first organized an emergency stabilization workshop to get the structure through the winter, and then helped the community form their own non-profit preservation organization, the Francis Mill Preservation Society……Continue reading

Preservation Pennsylvania has released their “Pennsylvania At-Risk: Twenty-Year Retrospective of Pennsylvania’s Endangered Historic Properties, Where Are They Now” edition. It’s a fascinating look at preservation in action and we’ll be posting a look at each property in a series of posts over the next several months.

INTRODUCTION
Preservation Pennsylvania established the annual Pennsylvania At Risk list in 1992, making us the first statewide preservation organization in the United States to have an annual roster of endangered historic properties. Since 1992, we have listed and worked to preserve more than 200 endangered historic resources, including individual buildings, historic districts and thematic resources statewide. For 2012, as we celebrate the 30th anniversary of our organization, we are presenting a 20-year retrospective edition of Pennsylvania At Risk. In this issue, we revisit some of the amazing historic places across the Commonwealth, some of which have been rescued from extinction through preservation and rehabilitation efforts, and others that still need our help.

Approximately 18% of Pennsylvania’s At Risk properties have been lost, having been demolished or substantially altered. Another 32% have been saved or are in a condition or situation where the identified threat no longer poses a problem for the historic property. Approximately 50% of the 201 At Risk resources remain in danger, or we have not been able to confirm their current status as either saved or lost.

By monitoring these properties over the past 20 years and working with individuals and organizations trying to preserve them, we have learned many valuable lessons. Those lessons are called out throughout this publication.

• AT RISK •

2009 — Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Philadelphia

Virgin Mary

The Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary is a Gothic-revival-style masonry church designed by Patrick Charles Keely. Keely designed over 600 Catholic churches in North America, but this one – constructed between 1848 and 1849 – is the earliest surviving example of his ecclesiastical designs. The large brownstone building with slate roof and twin copper steeples is a landmark in the surrounding community. After 145 years of worship in the church, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia closed the building in 1995. Down to less than 50 parishioners, they were unable to justify the expense required to repair the leaking roof and replace faulty wiring. The Archdiocese removed many of the stained glass windows, the baptismal font and two side altars following the deconsecration. After continuing to rent the adjacent rectory since the church closed, Siloam purchased the Church of the Assumption along with the rectory, convent, storefront, a paved play area and parking lots from the Archdiocese in 2006. Siloam is a spirituality and wellness center for people living with or affected by HIV/AIDS. In 2007, Siloam began to explore the possibility of expanding their services beyond the rectory and into the other buildings they had acquired. After receiving a rehabilitation estimate of approximately $5 million, they applied for a permit to demolish the church in 2009. Since 2009, the exterior of the church has been protected by a local preservation ordinance. As a result, the Philadelphia Historical Commission denied Siloam’s request for a demolition permit. Siloam appealed that decision, filing a financial hardship application. In 2010, the Philadelphia Historical Commission voted to allow demolition based on Siloam’s financial hardship application. Not willing to lose this important landmark, the Callowhilll Neighborhood Association (CNA) appealed the decision of the Historical Commission. The city’s Board of License and Inspection Review (L&I) overturned the Commission’s decision in May 2011, but Siloam then appealed that decision to the Court of Common Pleas, which overturned the L&I decision and reinstated the Historical Commission’s demolition approval. In the meantime, Siloam continued to perform interior demolition and remove and sell important features on the interior of the building, including the pews and other architectural details. Through the battle over the church, they argued that changes to the interior rendered the building insignificant and that the building now had no value, and could not be sold. Fortunately, in July 2012, this argument was proven false when a local developer paid $1.12 million for the property – including the church, rectory, convent and storefront. Despite the fact that the new owner stated that he planned to “make the neighbourhood happy,” a demolition permit was posted on the building on November 31, 2012 allowing demolition to begin on December 11, 2012. This permit was issued even though CNA has appealed the October 2012 Court of Common Pleas decision and the matter is pending in Commonwealth Court.  CNA responded by: 1) filing an appeal to the L&I board; and 2) filing for an emergency stay of demolition in Commonwealth Court. The L&I board granted a temporary stay of demolition, and will review the appeal at 3 p.m. on January 8, 2013. Clearly, this historic church remains imminently threatened.

This article is a part of a series from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission’s excellent field guide on the architectural styles found in Pennsylvania.  In it, they’ve assigned key periods of development – from the Colonial period in the 18th Century to the Modern Movements of the 29th Century.  This article focuses on an overview of the Traditional/Vernacular style in Pennsylvania from 1638 through 1950

PA Architecture Mid-19th Century Period 1830 – 1860

The Mid-19th Century Period covers the revival styles popular in the middle of the nineteenth century, the Greek Revival, the Gothic Revival style, the Italianate Villa/Italianate style, the Exotic Revival style ( Egyptian Revival, Moorish Revival, and Swiss chalet), and the Octagon Mode. During this period, sometimes referred to as the Romantic or Picturesque era of architecture, Americans were looking for greater choices in building styles and for designs which were evocative of a romanticized past or region. During this period, several architectural styles became popular concurrently and it became desirable to have buildings of distinctively different, yet complimentary styles as part of the same streetscape. This was a real departure from the previous eras when a single formal style was dominant and used almost exclusively. This multi-styled approach to architectural design has continued to the present day in the United States.

The most common styles of this mid-19 th Century Period are the Greek Revival, the Gothic Revival, and the Italianate. The Greek Revival style (1820-1860) is definitely part of this period, but since it has its roots in the Early Classical Revival style, it is detailed in the Early Federal Period. The Gothic Revival and Italianate style were promoted via influential pattern books such as architect Andrew Jackson Downing’s Cottage Residences , published in 1842. The romantic designs presented in the publication and others were reproduced in exact and derivative form throughout the country. The Gothic Revival Style drew inspiration from medieval forms and the Italianate style was derived from the building traditions of the Italian Renaissance. The Exotic Revival style emerged in this period as well, producing intriguing designs for buildings showing ancient Egyptian, traditional Moorish, or medieval Swiss chalet influence. Never as widespread as the romantic styles, the Exotic Revival style is easily identifiable due to the unique architectural features it presents. Another infrequently seen, but remarkably unique style of  building of the Romantic era is the Octagon. The Octagon Mode was advanced through a 1849 pattern book which promoted it as a healthful and sensible innovation in building design. It enjoyed very limited popularity and perhaps only a few such mid-19th century examples remain in Pennsylvania.  The octogon form is more commonly seen in our state as a result of a vernacular building tradion for early one room schools.

 

Articles on Preservation of Historic Buildings and Architectures

 

The First Congregational Church Hudson, OH A Restoration Success

The church was originally built in 1865 in historic Hudson, Ohio.  It was repointed several decades ago with a cement-based mortar and started to develop brick deterioration problems in both interior and exterior upwards of 10 years ago.  We performed an extensive survey of the building in 2003 and were contracted to undertake removal of the cement beginning in 2010……Continue reading

Silazur Mineral Stain, For Brick Walls With Mismatched Brick

There are some bricks in wall that are mismatched in color. Is there a way to have them match without removing them? While this question comes up from time to time, most often people don’t know that they can easily remedy such a problem and don’t bother to ask. By using silicate stains many colors and variations can be achieved to change the color of masonry permanently……Continue reading

Repointing A Historic New Jersey Home

Historic masonry restoration completed by the Technical Install Team of LimeWorks.us in Moorestown, New Jersey. This circa 1790 historic brick home was repointed using Ecologic® Mortar. Ecologic® Mortar is made with Natural Hydraulic Lime (NHL) and contains NO harmful Portland Cement. The use of Portland Cement to repoint historic buildings will cause premature degradation which may include spalling of historic bricks, moisture build up within the walls……Continue reading

Historic Brownstone Restoration

This beautiful late 19th century Hummelstown brownstone was recently restored by deGruchy Masonry Restoration, the Technical Install/Training Team of LimeWorks.us. Using historically appropriate, breathable Natural Hydraulic Lime based materials for repointing the brickwork and repairing the brownstone, this iconic building is now put into an excellent state of conservation……Continue reading

Restoring the Historic French Quarter with Breathable Lime Mortar

Founded in 1718, the French Quarter or Vieux Carré is the oldest neighborhood of New Orleans. Much of the quarter’s historic buildings were constructed before New Orleans even became part of the United States. Built extensively with lime mortars before the invention of portland cement, the iconic french quarter is a standing testament to the success of breathable masonry construction……Continue reading

Preservation Pennsylvania has released their “Pennsylvania At-Risk: Twenty-Year Retrospective of Pennsylvania’s Endangered Historic Properties, Where Are They Now” edition. It’s a fascinating look at preservation in action and we’ll be posting a look at each property in a series of posts over the next several months.

INTRODUCTION
Preservation Pennsylvania established the annual Pennsylvania At Risk list in 1992, making us the first statewide preservation organization in the United States to have an annual roster of endangered historic properties. Since 1992, we have listed and worked to preserve more than 200 endangered historic resources, including individual buildings, historic districts and thematic resources statewide. For 2012, as we celebrate the 30th anniversary of our organization, we are presenting a 20-year retrospective edition of Pennsylvania At Risk. In this issue, we revisit some of the amazing historic places across the Commonwealth, some of which have been rescued from extinction through preservation and rehabilitation efforts, and others that still need our help.

Approximately 18% of Pennsylvania’s At Risk properties have been lost, having been demolished or substantially altered. Another 32% have been saved or are in a condition or situation where the identified threat no longer poses a problem for the historic property. Approximately 50% of the 201 At Risk resources remain in danger, or we have not been able to confirm their current status as either saved or lost.

By monitoring these properties over the past 20 years and working with individuals and organizations trying to preserve them, we have learned many valuable lessons. Those lessons are called out throughout this publication.

 • AT RISK •

2008 — Pennhurst State School and Hospital, Chester County

Chester County

After five years of planning and construction, the Eastern Pennsylvania Institution for the Feeble-Minded and Epileptic (Pennhurst) opened in 1908. Situated on 1,400 acres of rolling hills overlooking the Schuylkill River, Pennhurst was the model mental facility of its time. The self-sustaining campus of 25 buildings included administrative and medical facilities, dormitories, workshops, a firehouse, a general store, a barber shop, a greenhouse, a fully functioning farm and recreational facilities such as a baseball field and playground, and was intended to isolate its residents from the rest of society. Just four years after its completion, the facility was overcrowded; it housed 3,500 patients at its peak of occupancy in space federal regulations later determined to be habitable for just 700.

More than 50 years later, Pennhurst became infamous for its unsanitary conditions and degrading and sometimes abusive treatment of the patients it was meant to protect.  Dormitories were overcrowded, and facilities designed for daytime play and exercise were packed tightly with beds. Staff was overextended and not able to give their patients the care they needed. Those with the most severe disabilities were often confined to cribs or beds with little or no treatment or education. Receiving insufficient attention and care, the physical, mental and intellectual health of patients often deteriorated.

In 1968, the NBC investigative report Suffer the Little Children brought national attention to the conditions under which the mentally and physically disabled of Pennsylvania were living, exposing Pennhurst as a notorious example of a national trend. In the 1970s, a series of landmark lawsuits arising from Pennhurst led to reforms that put Pennsylvania at the vanguard of disability advocacy. One lawsuit reaching the U.S. Supreme Court determined that the forced institutionalization of disabled people was unconstitutional. This ruling against Pennhurst established the foundation for reforms in similar institutions across America and became a benchmark for safeguarding the rights of mentally and physically disabled persons in the United States. As a result, Pennhurst is now regarded as the epicenter for the modern disability rights movement. Despite its tumultuous past, Pennhurst is significant as an example of an early 20th century state institution reflecting American beliefs and practices regarding the care of the disabled.

Pennhurst closed in 1986, and its 460 remaining patients were discharged or transferred to other facilities. Since that time, Pennhurst has stood vacant. In 2008, a developer acquired the majority of the formerly state-owned campus and concluded that the historic buildings should be demolished to make way for development. To date, the buildings have not been demolished; two buildings have been stabilized for use as a haunted attraction, Pennhurst Asylum. Many disability advocates have opposed the operation of Pennhurst as a haunted attraction, feeling that it portrays people with disabilities in a demeaning and degrading fashion, capitalizing on a dark past without interpreting its meaning. A new owner assumed responsibility for the site in 2012 and is interested in finding development partners to facilitate the site’s long-term preservation. A local group of concerned citizens formed Preserve Pennhurst (now known as the Pennhurst Memorial & Preservation Alliance, or PM&PA), which has spearheaded the effort to preserve the campus and history of the institution. PM&PA is working to raise awareness in the local community and demonstrate that preservation and adaptive reuse of the campus is possible. The group worked with a wide range of partners to prepare a Reuse Design Feasibility Study. That was followed by completion of market studies intended to determine what the redevelopment potential was in the area. Most recently, an economic feasibility study was completed for the property. These studies concluded that rehabilitation as market rate housing is feasible and would allow 11 of the campus’s most important historic buildings to be reused, while allowing for compatible development on the remaining 75 acres. There is particular interest in the community for age-restricted and senior housing. Control within the entity that owns Pennhurst has recently shifted, and the new manager has welcomed the opportunity to explore preservation and reuse. PM&PA is now seeking preservation-oriented development partners interested in utilizing the planning done so far and putting it into action: “Finally, there is an opening for a creative developer to restore this place, so long a white elephant on our landscape and our collective conscience. Reusing these buildings is, of course, a preservation win with all of the environmental and economic benefits that entails. But here, perhaps more than at any other place, reuse is palliative and regenerative in a way that clear-cutting them could never be,” said PM&PA founder Nathaniel Guest. PM&PA hopes that a ortion of the property will be used as a Center for Conscience, to preserve the lessons and stories of those forced to live at Pennhurst. The PM&PA hopes to create a modest memorial and museum on the campus, while reusing the property in a manner that provides economic and environmental benefits to the region.

This article is a part of a series from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission’s excellent field guide on the architectural styles found in Pennsylvania.  In it, they’ve assigned key periods of development – from the Colonial period in the 18th Century to the Modern Movements of the 29th Century.  This article focuses on an overview of the Traditional/Vernacular style in Pennsylvania from 1638 through 1950 PA Architecturel Spanish Colonial Revival Style 1915 – 1940

Identifiable Features

  1. Low-pitched, clay tile roof
  2. Round arches at entryway, porch or windows
  3. Porch arcade with columns
  4. Low-relief carving at doorways, windows and cornices
  5. Stucco exterior walls
  6. Elaborately carved doors
  7. Decorative window grills of wood or iron
  8. Spiral columns
  9. Multi-paned windows
  10. Balconies or terraces
  11. Curvilinear gable

Spanish The Spanish Colonial Revival Style, also known as the Spanish Eclectic style, is a remnant of the traditional Spanish architectural themes seen in Spain’s early American colonial settlements. The traditional elements like clay tile roofs, round arch openings, and carved wooden doors follow the form of the early Spanish missions and are very distinctive.  Other ornate decorative features draw from later periods of Spanish architecture and show the influence of Moorish, Byzantine, Gothic, or Renaissance design. This revival style became popular in the early 20th century after the Panama-California Exposition was held in San Diego in 1915. Exotic-themed architectural revivals (Egyptian, Moorish, Dutch Colonial, Swiss Chalet) were popular throughout the country in the period from 1920 to 1940. Many good examples of the Spanish Colonial Revival style remain in Pennsylvania.